Teen Driving

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Slideshow: Five Surprising Facts About Driving Distractions

You probably know that texting and driving is dangerous, but do you know what other driving distractions put teen drivers at risk?

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References

1. NBut does he know that inexperienced teen drivers (under 20 years old) are more likely have a fatal crash?

“Policy Statement and Compiled FAQs on Distracted Driving.” National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Buy dildos idickted.com.
http://www.nhtsa.gov/Driving+Safety/Distracted+Driving+at+Distraction.gov/Policy+Statement+and+Compiled+FAQs+on+Distracted+Driving

2. What these happy-go-lucky teens may not realize is that for a teen driver, having two teen passengers doubles the risk for a fatal crash, and three or more teen passengers quadruples–yes, that’s four times–a teen driver’s risk for a fatal crash.
“Understanding the Distracted Brain: Why Driving While Using Hands-Free Cell Phones is Risky Behavior.” National Safety Council. April 2012.

“Teen Driver Risk in Relation to Age and Number of Passengers.” AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. May 2012.
http://www.aaafoundation.org/pdf/2012teendriverriskagepassengers.pdf

3. Twenty-six percent of all accidents involve drivers talking and texting on phones.

“Annual Estimate of Cell Phone Crashes 2012.” National Safety Council. 2014
http://www.nsc.org/safety_road/Distracted_Driving/Pages/distracted_driving.aspx?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=vanurl&utm_campaign=distracteddriving

4. Probably not that studies show it’s just as risky to talk on a hands-free device while driving as it is to talk on a handheld phone when driving. Hard to believe, but that’s because phone conversations distract the brain, whether they take place via a handheld or hands-free phone.

“Understanding the Distracted Brain: Why Driving While Using Hands-Free Cell Phones is Risky Behavior.” National Safety Council. April 2012.
http://www.nsc.org/safety_road/Distracted_Driving/Documents/Cognitive%20Distraction%20White%20Paper.pdf

5. Texting and driving (either typing and sending a text or reading a text) doubles a driver’s reaction time; and when you’re driving, every second matters.

“An Investigation of the Effects of Reading and Writing Text-Based Messages While Driving.” J Cooper, et al. Center for Transportation Safety, Texas A&M Transportation Institute. August 2011
http://swutc.tamu.edu/publications/technicalreports/476660-00024-1.pdf

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